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Sia We Are Born Rar ~REPACK~



One enters the garden of Saadi through a narrow gate, guarded by a stubborn and unusually rude man, who scrutinises the visitor and his ticket very closely. Once inside, a stoned pathway with Cyprus and Orange groves surrounds and the sweet scent of Shiraz envelops. Somewhere inside this garden a speaker is located which plays a beautiful recitation of the poems by Saadi, mostly from his famous Gulistan.




Sia We Are Born Rar



A Sufi saint, Khawaju was born in the city of Kerman and is today buried on this gorge by the city entrance of Quran gate on the foot of the Sabuy mountain. Unroofed, the tomb is enclosed in glass and nearby is a stone statue of the saint.


Giacomo di Grassi was a 16th century Italian fencing master. Little is known about the life of this master, but he seems to have been born in Modena, Italy and acquired some fame as a fencing master in his youth. He operated a fencing school in Treviso and apparently traveled around Italy observing the teachings of other schools and masters.


For if men generally were not apt to contemplation and searching out of things: Or if God had not bestowed vpon euery man the grace, to be able to lift vp his minde from the earth, and by searching to finde out the causes thereof, and to imparte them to those who are lesse willing to take any paines therein: it would come to passe, that the one parte of men, as Lordes and Masters, should beare rule, and the other parte as vyle slaues, wrapped in perpetuall darknesse, should suffer and lead a life vnworthie the condition of man. Wherefore, in mine opinion it standes with great reason that a man participate that vnto others which he hath searched and found out by his great studie & trauaile. And therefore, I being euen from my childhood greatly delighted in the handling of weapons: after I had spent much time in the exercise thereof, was desyrous to see and beholde the most excellent and expert masters of this Arte, whome I haue generally marked, to teach after diuers wayes, much differing one from another, as though this misterie were destitute of order & rule, or depended onely vpon imagination, or on the deuise of him who professeth the same: Or as though it were a matter impossible to find out in this honourable exercise (as well as in all other Artes and Sciences) one onely good and true way, whereby a man may attaine to the intire knowledge of as much as may be practised with the weapon, not depending altogether vpon his owne head, or learning one blowe to day of one master, on the morowe of another, thereby busying himselfe about perticulars, the knowledge whereof is infinite, therefore impossible. Whereupon being forced, through a certaine honest desire which I beare to helpe others, I gaue my selfe wholy to the con- [v] templation thereof: hoping that at the length, I shoulde finde out the true principles and groundes of this Arte, and reduce the confused and infinite number of blowes into a compendious summe and certaine order: The which principles being but fewe, and therefore easie to be knowen and borne away, without doubt in small time, and little trauaile, will open a most large entrance to the vnderstanding of all that which is contained in this Arte. Neither was I in this frustrate at all of my expectation: For in conclusion after much deliberation, I haue found out this Arte, from the which onely dependeth the knowledge of all that which a man may performe with a weapon in his hand, and not onely with those weapons which are found out in these our dayes, but also with those that shall be inuented in time to come: Considering this Arte is grounded vpon Offence and Defence, both the which are practised in the straight and circuler lynes, for that a man may not otherwise either strike or defend.


The right leg ought always to be the strength of the right hand, and likewise the left leg of the left hand: So that if at any time it shall happen a thrust to be forcibly delivered, reason would that it be accompanied with the leg: for otherwise, by means of the force and weight, which is without the perpendicular or hanging line of the body, having no prop to sustain it, a man is in danger of falling. And it is to be understood, that the pace does naturally so much increase or diminish his motion, as the hand. Therefore we see when the right foot is behind, the hand is there also: for what who so strains himself to stand otherwise, as he offers violence unto nature, so he can never endure it: wherefore when he stands at his ward, bearing his hand wide, there also the foot helps by his strength, being placed towards that part: and when the hand is borne low, and the right foot before, if then he would lift his hand aloft, it is necessary that he draw back his foot: And there is so much distance from the place where the foot does part, to join itself to the other foot, as there is from the place whence the hand parts, to that place where it remains steadfast, little more or less: wherefore presupposing the said rules to be true, he must have great care to make his pace, h move his hand at one time together: And above all, not to skip or leap, but keep one foot always firm and steadfast: and when he would move it, to do it upon some great occasion, considering the foot ought chiefly to agree in motion with the hand, which hand, ought not in any case what soever happen to vary from his purpose, either in striking or defending.


THe right legge ought alwaies to be the strength of the right hand, and likewise the lefte legge of the left hand: So that if at any time it shall happen a thrust to bee forciblie deliuered, reson would that it be accom- [21] panied with the legge: for otherwise, by meanes of the force and waight, which is without the perpendiculer or hanging line of the body, hauing no prope to sustain it, a man is in daunger of falling. And it is to be vnderstood, that the pace doth naturally so much increase or diminish his motion, as the hand. Therefore we see when the right foote is behinde, the hand is there also: so that who so straineth himselfe to stand otherwise, as he offereth violence vnto nature, so hee canne neuer indure it: wherefore when he standeth at his ward, bearing his hand wide, there also the foote helpeth by his strength, being placed towards that parte: & when the hand is borne a lowe, & the right foote before, if then he would lifte his hand alofte, it is necessarie that he draw backe his foote: And there is so much distance from the place where the foot doth parte, to ioyne it selfe to the other foote, as there is from the place whence the hande parteth, to that place wher it remaineth stedfast, litle more or lesse: wherefore, presupposing the said rules to be true, he must haue great care to make his pace, & moue his hand at one time together: And a boue all, not to skip or leape, but keepe one foote alwaies firme and stedfast: and when he would moue it, to do it vpon some great occasion, considering the foote ought chiefely to agree in motion with the hand, which hande, ought not in any case what soeuer happen to varie from his purpose, either in striking or defending.


In this, and in all other wards, it is diligently to be noted, that he bear his weapons so orderly disposed, that the straight line which goes from the sword's point be still best to strike the enemy, either in the face or the breast: for if the point be so borne that it respect over the enemy's head, the enemy may easily first enter underneath and strike before the fall or descend thereof: And by holding the point two low, he may by beating it somewhat downwards cause it to be quit void of his body, and so safely come in to strike, the which has been many times seen.


In this, and in al other wardes, it is diligently to be noted, that he beare his weapons so orderly disposed, that the streight lyne which goeth from the swords point be stil bēt to strike the enemy, ether in the face or in the brest: for if the point be so borne that it respect ouer the enemies head, the enemie may easely first enter vnderneth & strike before the fall or discend thereof: And by holding the poynt two lowe, he may by beating it somewhat downwards cause it to be quit void of his bodie, and so safelie come in to strik, the which hath bine manie times sene.


This second ward from the effect shall be called the broad or wide ward, because the Arm widening and stretching itself directly as much as possible from the right side, bears the sword so far off from the body, that it seems to give great scope to the enemy to enter, albeit in truth it be nothing so. For although the hand and the handle of the sword, be both far from the body, and quite out of the straight line, yet the point of the sword, from which principally proceeds the offense, is not without the said line: For it is borne so bending toward the left side that it respects directly to strike the enemy, and being borne in that sort, it may very well both strike and defend. And when the point of the sword is borne out of the straight line, as the hand and handle is, then a man is in danger to be hurt easily by the enemy, the which happens not when the point is bending, for in such order, it is as a bar and defense to the whole body.


THis second warde from the effecte shall be called the broad or wide warde, because the Arme widning and stretching it selfe directlie as much as is possible from the right side, beareth the sword so farre off from the bodie, that it seemeth to giue great scope to the enimie to enter, albe it in truth it be nothing so. For although the hand & the handle of the sworde, be both farr from the bodie, and quite out of the streight line, yet the poynt of the sworde, from which principallie procedeth the offence, is not [26] without the saide lyne: For it is borne so bending towarde the left side that it respecteth directlie to strike the enimie, and being borne in that sorte, it may verie well both strike and defend. And when the poynt of the sword is borne out of the streight lyne, as the hand and handle is, then a man is in daunger to bee hurte caselie by the enimie, the which happeneth not when the poynt is bending, for in such order, it is as a barre and defence to the whole bodie. 350c69d7ab


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